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which configuration suggested for aspnet & sql server ? Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, January 10, 2013 1:26 PM
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dear friends,

I need sql server up and running nomatter what happens. I need to host a aspnet web application with sql2012. I can rent 2 or 3 web servers. here's what I got:

2 or 3 web servers
esxi for virtualization
sql2012 enterprise
windows 2008r2 or windows 2012, enterprise if necessary.

I experimented mirroring and replication. but didn't like active directory requirements very much. first of all configuration is complex. error messages about failover clustering are not explanatory. also as I backup active directory server itself, I would need 4 servers. 2 of them only for AD. it seems waste of resources to me. After 2 weeks of install and test process, active directory is not what I'm looking for.

what I'm asking is, if anyone knows or uses any solution without active directory ? maybe mirroring, maybe replication, maybe always on option. maybe some synch options in web application and sql server itself.

I want to think like that : "something happened to server, no problem. other server is running and I can easily restore backup image or re-install without configuration headaches". let me give an example. at the moment I use virtual machine in vmserver. if something goes wrong I restore backup, copy vmware files from backup and I'm completely SURE that no configuration problems would occur after restore and in 5 minutes I will be up and running. except SQL. I need a hot backup of sql server and it definitely must be another physical server.

any configuration suggestion please ?
Post #1405626
Posted Thursday, January 10, 2013 5:24 PM


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database mirroring is probably the simplest way to do this. You might read up on it and see if that meets your needs.






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Post #1405702
Posted Friday, January 11, 2013 3:56 AM
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I experimented mirroring and replication. but didn't like active directory requirements very much. first of all configuration is complex. error messages about failover clustering are not explanatory.


Mirroring, replication and failover cluster are entirely different concepts. If you were experimenting with just mirroring or replication you would not be getting any clustering errors, as these technologies are independant of clustering (although they can be incorporated with clustering to an extent).

If you are reviewing SQL Server 2012 I would suggest researching AlwaysOn. It is pretty much the next version of mirroring and works with groups of databases versus individual databases which is what database mirroring does. Also from what I hear it is easier to setup as well. Additionally as of SQL Server 2012 database mirroring is now a deprecated feature in favor of AlwaysOn.


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Post #1405869
Posted Friday, January 11, 2013 6:38 AM


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Just for the record, we're in a SQL 2008 forum but we're talking about SQL 2012.

AlwaysOn requires an Active Directory (AD) domain. If you want to avoid AD and Windows Clusters (also required for AlwaysOn) then look into log shipping (or mirroring if you do not mind that it has been deprecated). Personally I would not look at replication for disaster recovery.

If you "need sql server up and running nomatter what happens" then AD and Windows Clustering are in your future, use AlwaysOn.


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Post #1405972
Posted Friday, January 11, 2013 8:43 AM


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AD isn't that big a deal, and most of these technologies will require some parts of it since you are trying to move information around. For a relatively low volume of authentication, I'd think making your machines DCs would work. However you'd have to learn something about networking, and security, otherwise you are asking for trouble at some point.

I agree with what OPC.Three said. Replication is not a good answer unless you are very experienced with how it works and the potential issues.







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Post #1406093
Posted Tuesday, January 15, 2013 2:44 AM
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okay, not related with this topic but if I use ms azure for hosting instead of renting my own physical one, would I guarantee that my sql data will always be there ?
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Posted Tuesday, January 15, 2013 6:34 AM


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aykut canturk (1/15/2013)
okay, not related with this topic but if I use ms azure for hosting instead of renting my own physical one, would I guarantee that my sql data will always be there ?

Always and forever? I doubt anyone could say for sure how long the Azure platform will remain viable. If the effort failed, which I do not think it will, I suppose Microsoft could evict all Azure tenants but given how much they have invested and the ill-will it would generate I doubt that would occur anytime soon, minimum 5 years, more likely 10+.

In terms of availability itself one of the underlying principles of the cloud platform is that all data is made to be redundant. Data protection is baked right into the Azure SQL Database product. In fact all data sent or changed in the database is automatically committed in two places before the transaction is considered completed and control is returned to the caller and Microsoft guarantees effectively 100% availability of the service.

There are two Azure forums here on SSC. If you have more questions you could consider posting a new thread there.

Cloud Computing


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Post #1407236
Posted Tuesday, January 15, 2013 9:37 AM


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aykut canturk (1/15/2013)
okay, not related with this topic but if I use ms azure for hosting instead of renting my own physical one, would I guarantee that my sql data will always be there ?


Azure has triple redundancy, but that's not always enough. It's replicated, which is good, but what if your client deletes a table. The delete gets replicated, as it should, and you lose data.

You don't need HA as much with Azure, but you do need some DR and some backups.







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