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Is it OK to ask salary range before applying? Expand / Collapse
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Posted Friday, August 24, 2012 10:33 AM
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Hi all,

I came across a Jr. DBA position with no salary attached. A google search of the company didn't turn up any published salary ranges.

Would it be considered rude to email the contact and *politely* ask the range before applying? I'm employed, so I'm not desperate and can't take a pay cut although a lateral move would be fine since this is a position I have a strong interest in.

Thoughts?

Thanks,
Mark



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Posted Friday, August 24, 2012 10:38 AM
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Mark Eckeard (8/24/2012)
Hi all,

I came across a Jr. DBA position with no salary attached. A google search of the company didn't turn up any published salary ranges.

Would it be considered rude to email the contact and *politely* ask the range before applying? I'm employed, so I'm not desperate and can't take a pay cut although a lateral move would be fine since this is a position I have a strong interest in.

Thoughts?

Thanks,
Mark

I've had it pounded into my head that yes, it is rude to ask about salary, unless the interviewer asks you first. So from my perspective, it's probably better to be safe and not ask.

My thought: put in for it and see what happens. You never know.
Post #1349809
Posted Friday, August 24, 2012 11:00 AM


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You could waste a lot of time applying for jobs you won't take. OK if you've got the time...
Post #1349818
Posted Friday, August 24, 2012 11:13 AM


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True story: my wife was miserable at her job; mean co-workers and the usual underpaid, overworked, underappreciated, story.

so I told her she should start shopping around, but not settling for some place who was going to give her twenty five cents more for doing the same job.

At an interview, she was offered a position, and no kidding, the offer was exactly twenty-five cents more(per hour) than she was currently making. she laughed because she remembered what i said, but the interviewer took it as laughing at the offer, and promptly increased the offer substantially; with the "but with your experience, we can offer you $x. "

she was happy with the offer then, and took the job, but we still recall how it happened.

I'm not saying to laugh at the amount you get offered, but at least go in with your eyes open and be aware of the current rates, as well as your own assesment of your skillset.


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Post #1349826
Posted Friday, August 24, 2012 11:14 AM


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You will notice a double standard here. The potential employer will ask for salary history from prospective employees but many refuse to tell these same people what they may expect as salary.

IMHO, if an employer is unwilling to publish a salary range, they should be be prohibited from asking a prospective employee what they make(made). There should be some reciprocity here.

In this situation, I would apply. If the salary turns out to be too low, no one is forcing you to accept the position. That fact that you are currently employed helps you.



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Post #1349829
Posted Friday, August 24, 2012 12:03 PM
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It used to be consider bad form to ask about salary and benefits in the first interview. However, that is beginning to change. I've had interviews in the last two years where they ask for current salary and I ask them what they'd be offering. It's very practical in that you both get to see if you're at least a match in pay.

I don't ask right away in the first interview. I wait for the employer to ask me first and I ask them if they are willing to reciprocate. I found that some are willing to discuss it up front.
Post #1349854
Posted Friday, August 24, 2012 1:54 PM
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I discuss it right up front. I do my best to bring it up politely, but I do bring that up along with time-off, on call duties, and a few other important things. I let the interviewer/recuiter know that I don't want to waste their time, as I am employed and won't be able to consider anything too far below what I am currently making.

I have had quite a few thank me for being so open. I had one who said that they don't discuss salary until the final interview....I made it to the final interview and got a job offer letter...had to turn it down as it was way below what I was currently making ($30,000 less). I made a counter offer, but they refused that and so I sent them my letter thanking them for their time and I let them know in my response that they could have saved themselves a lot of trouble and possibly found the right individual if they had discussed salary from the beginning.

So, I believe it is proper to bring up salary from the beginning....but you need to do it politely and let the company know you are trying to make sure their time isn't wasted.

-SQLBill



Post #1349908
Posted Friday, August 24, 2012 2:55 PM
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Great feedback. Thanks guys.

Mark



Post #1349938
Posted Friday, August 24, 2012 3:21 PM


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I'm of the personal opinion that I work for money, my money. That's not what employers want to hear, however. So, as mentioned, there's a balance point. But I usually ask before we even waste time on the interview, at least for an expected range. It takes me time and effort to attend the interview, at least twice as much time as it takes the interviewer. Researching the company, getting to and from the location, etc etc.

If they don't understand I care about what they're willing to pay, I don't understand why they think I should care about their future profitability.



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Post #1349947
Posted Friday, August 24, 2012 4:29 PM


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I find nothing wrong with asking the salary range. If a company gets upset about that, it may be a red flag that you don't actually want to work for them anyway.

So far as requiring proof of prior salary, thats a huge red flag for me and I simply refuse to expose that information.


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