Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase 12»»

Landing The First SQL Job.... Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Monday, August 6, 2012 8:33 PM
Grasshopper

GrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopper

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, February 20, 2014 12:11 PM
Points: 24, Visits: 38
Hello All!

I currently am a plumber by trade, been in that industry courtesy of my father in law since graduating high school. I am really just wore out on the trade and state of the industry in our area. I had my own company for 8+ years and did pretty decent for many years. Im still relatively young at 34, but at any rate all that is history! I have been looking at making a big career change. So....

I have been studying and working through the book series Joes 2 Pros over the last month and a half or so and I am getting close to being proficient enough to test for my 70-433 exam. I have worked through the labs and all using my Developer edition so I do have VERY little hands on experience.

I have recently been looking on many of the Job sites with keywords SQL developer or Sql DBA. Everything in the areas I am interested in working in (Texas or Minnesota) require experience of at least 3 years. I have been applying anyway but of course not having much luck landing interviews.

Does anyone have any kind of advice they could offer? I am very confident in my ability to contribute in meaningful ways. I know I will not be the best guy on any given team in the near future. But, I know I will be one of the biggest sponges in the place. I am a quick learner and I am very driven to suceed.
succeedrently live in Texas and really desire to relocate my family to Minnesota. I am considering a trip to MN to try and introduce myself and hand deliver a copy of my resume and cover letter to many of the shops around. For those in the industry do you think this could be a good thing and give me a foot in a door? Or would it make me the creepy overly persisitant guy? I just know I am going to have to make myself stand out in some way, and that was one idea I had.

Any help anyone could give would be GREATLY appreciated.


--Andy
Post #1340975
Posted Tuesday, August 7, 2012 12:16 AM


SSChasing Mays

SSChasing MaysSSChasing MaysSSChasing MaysSSChasing MaysSSChasing MaysSSChasing MaysSSChasing MaysSSChasing Mays

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, October 17, 2014 7:06 AM
Points: 612, Visits: 2,853
First, being a DBA and a SQL developer is an excellent experience on bothaccounts. This is also a great time as there is a HUGE shortage of DBAs and Database developers (DBAs more so)

I'll tell you how I became a DBA and give you a few tips.

Becoming a DBA
Before I was a DBA I spent about 4 years as a level 1,2, then lead tech support guy working on a SQL based application. Thats how I got exposure to SQL Development and basic DBA tasks (moves, backups, SQL setups, upgrades, etc). I was in college and, when I graduated I did not know what I wanted to do. I ended up doing AD, Exchange, Server administration and alike for a few years.

(no, you don't need to do all this to become a DBA)

Later I spent a couple years as a (though it was not my title) an XML/XSLT developer working on another SQL based product. I began looking for SQL jobs (I would search for "SQL" under job title.) I got some interviews and landed the job. My last DBA job title was 2nd VP of DB Engineering at a Fortune something co. Now I do BI development and am an aspiring Data Scientist.

Conventional wisdom would dictate that people don't go directly from plumber to DBA. I mentioned how I did it to give you an idea of how someone gets there. You will have a good idea of what you need to know after your first interview. If you know from the get-go DBA is what you want then here's how to get there the fastest:

Study, study, study... Paractice, practice, practice...
You don't have to spend a dime at first, really. Books online, Microsoft free Elearning, forums, etc. You can download the SQL Server free version and go to town. Dig around, back up a DB, try to build a cube, whatever: This, too, will help you know how much you like it. If you love it, then study and practice your butt off; the more time you spend doing that the less time you have to wait to get that gig.

If you end up first getting a lower level SQL job then volunteer for everything that will help you learn. If you do that you may become an "Accidental DBA"

Read everything on SSC and other forumns, blogs, etc.

My personal tip: learn XML too! Many people will disagree with that but knowing XML has helped me with being a DBA, SQL Developer and BI guy in many ways and has been a huge advantage.


-- Alan Burstein



Read this article for best practices on asking questions.
Need to split a string? Try this (Jeff Moden)
Need a pattern-based string spitter? Try this (Dwain Camps)

"I can't stress enough the importance of switching from a 'sequential files' mindset to 'set-based' thinking. After you make the switch, you can spend your time tuning and optimizing your queries instead of maintaining lengthy, poor-performing code. " -- Itzek Ben-Gan 2001

My blog
Post #1341025
Posted Tuesday, August 7, 2012 10:19 AM
SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, August 20, 2014 5:24 AM
Points: 128, Visits: 490
Getting certifiied may help but from someone who read the Joe's to Pro's series, don't use it exclusively. They cover a lot and the cost of the books are cheap but you'll need a lot more to pass the 70-433. XML was one topic that was high level and the questions I saw on my exam were WAY above the content in those books.

Stay on these forums, read blogs from other prominent MS MVP's or dedicated SQL people and join local user groups that focus on SQL. Most user groups offer regular seminars for little or nothing and it's a great way to learn and network.

Also, have your resume reviewed by a pro. With the amount of time I hear HR people spend on resumes, you only get a few seconds and need to make it count.

Good luck!

Mark



Post #1341393
Posted Tuesday, August 7, 2012 7:19 PM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 1:53 PM
Points: 35,366, Visits: 31,905
Ayeager78 (8/6/2012)
I am very confident in my ability to contribute in meaningful ways. I know I will not be the best guy on any given team in the near future. But, I know I will be one of the biggest sponges in the place. I am a quick learner and I am very driven to succeed.


Gosh... That DOES make it sound like you're driven. I believe I'd start out by putting that in a cover letter. Also, contact some recruiters and explain your current positition. IMHO, they're typically the best source for people just starting out.


--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Post #1341646
Posted Tuesday, August 7, 2012 7:42 PM
Grasshopper

GrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopper

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, February 20, 2014 12:11 PM
Points: 24, Visits: 38
Thanks for the Info Ya'll. I appreciate your input. I especially like hearing about the books I have been using from someone who has read them.

I plan on doing a "practice" exam on Measure-Up.com before signing up for the test so I know a little of what to expect anyway.

Thanks Again, and keep ideas coming please! I know I need all the help I can get!


--Andy
Post #1341648
Posted Tuesday, August 7, 2012 7:51 PM


SSC-Insane

SSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-Insane

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 3:27 PM
Points: 20,734, Visits: 32,505
Go to sqlpass.org and do a search for user groups in your area. You could make some good contacts there.



Lynn Pettis

For better assistance in answering your questions, click here
For tips to get better help with Performance Problems, click here
For Running Totals and its variations, click here or when working with partitioned tables
For more about Tally Tables, click here
For more about Cross Tabs and Pivots, click here and here
Managing Transaction Logs

SQL Musings from the Desert Fountain Valley SQL (My Mirror Blog)
Post #1341650
Posted Tuesday, August 7, 2012 8:26 PM
SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, August 20, 2014 5:24 AM
Points: 128, Visits: 490
It's like we're twins or taking the same path to certification!

Skip measure up. Like the J2P book series, it's not very accurate. Personally, I focused way too much on the study material in those books and the test exam and my exam hardly resembled either.

I'm set to take my exam around the middle of August and this time I'll walk in knowing what to expect from the test and will be armed with better overall knowledge.

Mark



Post #1341653
Posted Thursday, August 9, 2012 4:01 PM
SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 12:45 PM
Points: 190, Visits: 1,189
When you are interviewing, be prepared to articulate precisely why you chose this specific career path. People who succeed over the long haul are the ones that do things for the right reasons. Motivation (desire) is the basis for everything.
Post #1343061
Posted Thursday, August 9, 2012 9:57 PM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 1:53 PM
Points: 35,366, Visits: 31,905
jshahan (8/9/2012)
When you are interviewing, be prepared to articulate precisely why you chose this specific career path. People who succeed over the long haul are the ones that do things for the right reasons. Motivation (desire) is the basis for everything.


Whatever you do, don't say you're doing it for the money. It makes you a future "flight risk".


--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Post #1343123
Posted Sunday, August 12, 2012 5:34 PM
Grasshopper

GrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopper

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, February 20, 2014 12:11 PM
Points: 24, Visits: 38
Lynn Pettis (8/7/2012)
Go to sqlpass.org and do a search for user groups in your area. You could make some good contacts there.


Now Registered for a SQL Saturday in Minnesota Sept 29th. Not Local to where I am now but it is my homestate and the place I desire to live. I will definately be checking out local user Groups. Thanks for that Advice.

jshahan (8/9/2012)
When you are interviewing, be prepared to articulate precisely why you chose this specific career path. People who succeed over the long haul are the ones that do things for the right reasons. Motivation (desire) is the basis for everything.


Thanks Great Advice!

Jeff Moden (8/10/2012)
Whatever you do, don't say you're doing it for the money. It makes you a future "flight risk".


Well, it definatley is not just the money. Though providing better for my family is certianly a desire. Really I just don't feel like I am using the intelligence God gave me in near enough capacity. Looking for more of a challenge and I love seeing code actually work and knowing I had a part in it.

Thanks Agian you all! Hopefully I will find someone willing to take a chance on an unexperienced guy. I do know I fight the stereotype of your typical plumber. But most assuredly I am not your typical Plumber.

**Ha! Edited becuase my code did not work! Will I have success this time?**

**Third Time is a Charm. Why will typing in my own ' [ ' and ' ] ' not work? Just Curious.....


--Andy
Post #1343943
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase 12»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse