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Happy Holidays Expand / Collapse
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Posted Tuesday, January 3, 2012 8:10 AM


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marlon.seton (1/3/2012)
Yes, here in the UK, it's turkey for Xmas and Happy Christmas, not Happy Holidays.

Well, that shows as much cultural bias (but towards one culture of the UK) as did the QotD and answer (towards United states culture).

There in the UK it is presumably as you describe; but I would be greatly surprised if " Happy Christmas" were as common amongst the UK's English speakers as is "Merry Christmas" (and the tendency to combine good wishes for Christmas with those for new year pushes things to wards "merry") so perhaps "there" is quite a small area?

Elsewhere in the UK it is salmon for Christmas and Nollaig Chridheil not Happy Christmas; or it's Nollaig Shona or Nadolig Llawen, or something else (I don't speak all the UK's indigenous languages) - please remember that the UK is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Island, not the United Kingdom of England and nowhere else, and has 5 living indigenous languages not just one, and that some parts of the UK have substantial cultural differences from other parts.

Anyway, Happy New Year, Bliadhna Mhath Ur, Athbliain faoi Mhaise, Blwyddyn Newydd Dda, or whatever.


Tom
Post #1229294
Posted Tuesday, January 3, 2012 8:56 AM
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L' Eomot Inversé (1/3/2012)
marlon.seton (1/3/2012)
Yes, here in the UK, it's turkey for Xmas and Happy Christmas, not Happy Holidays.

Well, that shows as much cultural bias (but towards one culture of the UK) as did the QotD and answer (towards United states culture).

There in the UK it is presumably as you describe; but I would be greatly surprised if " Happy Christmas" were as common amongst the UK's English speakers as is "Merry Christmas" (and the tendency to combine good wishes for Christmas with those for new year pushes things to wards "merry") so perhaps "there" is quite a small area?

Elsewhere in the UK it is salmon for Christmas and Nollaig Chridheil not Happy Christmas; or it's Nollaig Shona or Nadolig Llawen, or something else (I don't speak all the UK's indigenous languages) - please remember that the UK is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Island, not the United Kingdom of England and nowhere else, and has 5 living indigenous languages not just one, and that some parts of the UK have substantial cultural differences from other parts.

Anyway, Happy New Year, Bliadhna Mhath Ur, Athbliain faoi Mhaise, Blwyddyn Newydd Dda, or whatever.


Yes, indeed, Merry Christmas, not Happy Christmas; it was the "Happy" in Happy Holidays what tricked me, guv'nor, 'onest it was.

Just out of interest, what are the five living indigenous languages? I can think of English, Welsh, Gaelic and Scots. Are you counting Cornish? I thought that was officially dead.
Post #1229330
Posted Tuesday, January 3, 2012 9:43 AM
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Yes, I suppose I should have said "Merry Christmas" and "Happy New Year". But like Marlon, I was diverted by the "Happy Holidays" term.

Kenneth Spencer
Post #1229373
Posted Tuesday, January 3, 2012 10:52 AM


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marlon.seton (1/3/2012)
Yes, indeed, Merry Christmas, not Happy Christmas; it was the "Happy" in Happy Holidays what tricked me, guv'nor, 'onest it was.

Just out of interest, what are the five living indigenous languages? I can think of English, Welsh, Gaelic and Scots. Are you counting Cornish? I thought that was officially dead.

I was thionking of English, Welsh, Scots Gaelic, Irish (don't forget that "and Northern Ireland" bit in the title of the union)and Shelta (which is not as common as it used to be, but is still heard in Scotland, in Northern Ireland, and in parts of England and Wales, as well as in the Irish Republic - it seems to have originated as a sort of GA-GD-EN creole, borrowed some (very few) words from Rromani, and undergone deliberate obfuscation to allow secrets to be discussed where gadzhe could hear, and is now rapidly becoming anglicised - more so in Ireland than in England) so I guess I should have said 6 as had missed out Scots which is certainly both indigenous and alive. Some people would say that Rromani should be counted too, as it's been in the territory which is currently the UK since well before the union of crowns in 1605, but I left it out as it's not really indigenous. Some would want to add Cornish, but I'm not sure the revival is real. Manx (which isn't in my count, because Ellan Vannin is not part of the UK) rose from the almost dead - it even got a new orthography invented for it because no native speaker was literate in it and the Bishop who promoted the reviaval hadn't the wit to ask people across the straight in Scotland if they knew it, which explains why it's so horribly difficult for speakers of the other Goidelic languages to read it - but I'm not convinced that Cornish will manage to do the same rsurrection act so I kind of sit on the fence about Cornish.


Tom
Post #1229447
Posted Tuesday, January 10, 2012 6:32 PM


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Catching up with SSC upon return from vacation (er, "holiday" for you non-Americans).... Interesting span of response to the US-Centricity of this QOD. Just to fill in the gap, no, reindeer are not a common food source in the US. The reference is to a poem (some may call it doggerel) published a century and a half ago in which the author describes St Nicholas (AKA Santa Claus, Father Christmas, other aliases?) as delivering gifts by means of a flying sleigh drawn by "eight tiny reindeer". Here's a link to a copy of it: http://www.carols.org.uk/twas_the_night_before_christmas.htm
Post #1233671
Posted Friday, January 11, 2013 8:51 AM


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kaspencer (12/23/2011)
I have complained before about the fact that many of your non-SQLserver questions are far too centred on the American and assumes that everyone is American and lives in the USA.

Turkey is a valid answer, so you are absolutely incorrect in not allowing a point for selecting it.

I have never been quite sure of exactly what is meant by "Thanksgiving" but rest assured, our standard food fare at Christmas is turkey. Maybe Goose is a distant second. Please put this information into your database for future reference.

So there! Happy Christmas (and be damned with the expression "Happy Holidays"!).

Kenneth Spencer


Definitely turkey in the UK rather than reindeer!

In fact, most people in the UK, if asked what they thought of when 'turkey' is mentioned would probably say Christmas!


Derek
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