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Censoring the Internet Expand / Collapse
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Posted Monday, January 2, 2012 5:45 AM
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It is not good thing because it is against the democracy of people and right of every individual for free speech. I oppose this US congress movement.

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Post #1228892
Posted Monday, January 2, 2012 8:45 AM


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Dev (11/29/2011)
The US Congress is considering America's first system for censoring the Internet. Despite public outcry, the Internet Censorship bill could pass at any time. If it does, the Internet and free speech will never be the same.

What do you think?
http://americancensorship.org/


Hi Dev.

I think that organization is suspect, like totally bogus.

IMHO it appears that they are trying to trick you into getting personal information from you.

I could not find any pending legislation before the US House of Representatives or the US Senate.

You have to be a constituent before a House or Senate Member's Staff will take your call.

Talk to the State Department? Good luck.

This company will sell your personal information. Get ready for the Spam.


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Post #1228925
Posted Monday, January 2, 2012 3:10 PM


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I've not read the whole bill, yet, but my initial impression is that it's not trying to suppress "free speech". My impression is that it's trying to suppress copywrite infringments and other infringments by those who do not recognize such rights and to that I say "Hooray!"

Here's a link to a copy of the bill.
http://static.arstechnica.net/2011/10/26/SOPA.pdf


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"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

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Post #1228993
Posted Monday, January 2, 2012 7:23 PM


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They are trying to get their foot in to establish that the government has the final say about what is and what is not permissible on the Internet. And this bill is not about what it says, it is a trial balloon to gauge public response.

How do you, Jeff, like the idea that if the bill passes, some anonymous govt official can shut down your Web site and seize your domain, on someone's say-so, even if it means that it will deprive you of your livelihood?

The bill provides for no jury of your peers, no right to face your accuser, no due process. The switch can be turned off because you were accused (as opposed to convicted, in the court of law) of violating someone's copyright. All what is needed is to quote SOPA in a notification.
Post #1229021
Posted Wednesday, January 4, 2012 6:09 AM


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But there is a process. It's the same process someone has to go through with any "Cease and Desist" order.

I'll also add that there are many websites (for example) that have violated CopyRight laws and have been asked to voluntarily take the source of the violations down. Of course, being in a foreign country, they thumb their nose and keep right on trucking. The owner of the copyrighted material doesn't have much recourse when that happens.


--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Post #1229859
Posted Wednesday, January 4, 2012 8:15 AM


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Yes, from say American perspective. However, foreign countries are not obliged to follow American law with its 70 years copyright extensible by another 70. Only EU harmonizes its copyright laws with NAFTA (and vice versa). When established first time, copyright was for 15 years after author's death, and was meant to support children until they could take about themselves. Then it was extended to 50 years, and now up to 140. Not everyone agrees with this last extension.
Post #1229977
Posted Wednesday, January 4, 2012 8:27 AM


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Revenant (1/4/2012)
Yes, from say American perspective. However, foreign countries are not obliged to follow American law with its 70 years copyright extensible by another 70. Only EU harmonizes its copyright laws with NAFTA (and vice versa). When established first time, copyright was for 15 years after author's death, and was meant to support children until they could take about themselves. Then it was extended to 50 years, and now up to 140. Not everyone agrees with this last extension.


Count me in for disagreement . Is it the same for patents, I believe it's only 15 years for patents? I also believe it differs from country to country. (Just FYI for those who are unaware, Patents <> Copyrights)


Dev

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Post #1229991
Posted Wednesday, January 4, 2012 9:08 AM


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Dev (1/4/2012)
Revenant (1/4/2012)
Yes, from say American perspective. However, foreign countries are not obliged to follow American law with its 70 years copyright extensible by another 70. Only EU harmonizes its copyright laws with NAFTA (and vice versa). When established first time, copyright was for 15 years after author's death, and was meant to support children until they could take about themselves. Then it was extended to 50 years, and now up to 140. Not everyone agrees with this last extension.


Count me in for disagreement . Is it the same for patents, I believe it's only 15 years for patents? I also believe it differs from country to country. (Just FYI for those who are unaware, Patents <> Copyrights)

Yes, patents are 15 only. Re the 70 years I mentioned, check whether Mickey Mouse is still copyrighted. (Yes, it is, and not to a company.)

I forgot to mention that lkately there is also considerable pressure on fair use, among others, that even spoofing a work (such as say putting a moustache on Mona Lisa) is not fair use and if Mona Lisa were still copyrighted, Leonardo would be entitled to royalties. And museums are lobbying to get copyright on all works they have in their collections.
Post #1230035
Posted Wednesday, January 4, 2012 9:17 AM


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Revenant (1/4/2012)
Dev (1/4/2012)
Revenant (1/4/2012)
Yes, from say American perspective. However, foreign countries are not obliged to follow American law with its 70 years copyright extensible by another 70. Only EU harmonizes its copyright laws with NAFTA (and vice versa). When established first time, copyright was for 15 years after author's death, and was meant to support children until they could take about themselves. Then it was extended to 50 years, and now up to 140. Not everyone agrees with this last extension.


Count me in for disagreement . Is it the same for patents, I believe it's only 15 years for patents? I also believe it differs from country to country. (Just FYI for those who are unaware, Patents <> Copyrights)

Yes, patents are 15 only. Re the 70 years I mentioned, check whether Mickey Mouse is still copyrighted. (Yes, it is, and not to a company.)

I forgot to mention that lkately there is also considerable pressure on fair use, among others, that even spoofing a work (such as say putting a moustache on Mona Lisa) is not fair use and if Mona Lisa were still copyrighted, Leonardo would be entitled to royalties. And museums are lobbying to get copyright on all works they have in their collections.


In that sense, heir of Leonardo will enjoy (born to be rich ).


Dev

Devendra Shirbad | BIG Data Architect / DBA | Ex-Microsoft CSS (SQL 3T)
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LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/devendrashirbad
Post #1230046
Posted Wednesday, January 4, 2012 9:20 AM


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Revenant (1/4/2012)
Dev (1/4/2012)
Revenant (1/4/2012)
Yes, from say American perspective. However, foreign countries are not obliged to follow American law with its 70 years copyright extensible by another 70. Only EU harmonizes its copyright laws with NAFTA (and vice versa). When established first time, copyright was for 15 years after author's death, and was meant to support children until they could take about themselves. Then it was extended to 50 years, and now up to 140. Not everyone agrees with this last extension.


Count me in for disagreement . Is it the same for patents, I believe it's only 15 years for patents? I also believe it differs from country to country. (Just FYI for those who are unaware, Patents <> Copyrights)

Yes, patents are 15 only. Re the 70 years I mentioned, check whether Mickey Mouse is still copyrighted. (Yes, it is, and not to a company.)

I forgot to mention that lkately there is also considerable pressure on fair use, among others, that even spoofing a work (such as say putting a moustache on Mona Lisa) is not fair use and if Mona Lisa were still copyrighted, Leonardo would be entitled to royalties. And museums are lobbying to get copyright on all works they have in their collections.



What would it get to the museums? Wouldn't the $ go to the authors? I'm sure they could then negociate a share of the sales in the souvenir shop but that's about it.
Post #1230049
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