Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase ««1234»»»

Using and Creating Mount Points in SQL Server Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Thursday, November 10, 2011 12:26 PM


SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, August 21, 2014 12:21 PM
Points: 117, Visits: 572
Thanks. Did a quick "truncate the zeros" to come up with 7GB, not using exact science...

Anyway, it's obvious I'm no Windows Disk Management proficianado - didn't see the 7GB in the background of the Unallocated Partition snapshot. It's clear to me, now, that pre-allocation of partitions occurs prior to mount-point definition and I'll be sure to make mine around 250GB to 500GB for the tables and partitions I have to deal with.

Cheers. Appreciate the detail you went to in the article.
Post #1203791
Posted Thursday, November 10, 2011 12:58 PM


SSCertifiable

SSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiable

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 2:38 PM
Points: 6,350, Visits: 13,675
SAinCA (11/10/2011)
I'll be sure to make mine around 250GB to 500GB for the tables and partitions I have to deal with.

Cheers. Appreciate the detail you went to in the article.

Ok, just be sure to select the correct disk type from the start. For large disks GPT is more robust than MBR.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Ya can't make an omelette without breaking just a few eggs"
Post #1203803
Posted Thursday, November 10, 2011 2:54 PM


Say Hey Kid

Say Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey Kid

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Saturday, September 6, 2014 8:20 AM
Points: 687, Visits: 3,004
SAinCA (11/10/2011)
I'm no Windows Disk Management proficianado -

That's great, I'm gonna add that word to my list!
Rich
Post #1203853
Posted Thursday, November 10, 2011 10:25 PM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, April 1, 2014 9:13 AM
Points: 6, Visits: 85
Maybe it's better to check thoose numbers at the storage system level instead? In the storage system where I work there's also easy to see for example write latency, good way to get a rough idea about the load.
Post #1203910
Posted Wednesday, November 16, 2011 3:57 AM
Valued Member

Valued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued Member

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, January 29, 2014 5:32 PM
Points: 73, Visits: 94
Hi Perry

Note : I hope this won't get confusing as my name is also Perry!

Take this scenario...

2 node active/passive cluster - SQL 2008 R2 on Windows 2008 R2
All data, log, backup drives hosted on SAN as drives F: , G: , H: respectively
Each node has 2 x SSD in RAID 1 configured as T:

Have you tried making a mount point on F: targeting the LOCAL SSD drive T: ?

We are looking at this technique to get tempdb and ASPState hosted in local SSD in a clustered solution. As tempdb and ASPState are db's that don't require persistence across a failover it appears to work as does not prevent the cluster from working or having SQL service packs / cumulative updates applied.

I am getting feedback on other forums that this is unsupported configuration by MS but http://support.microsoft.com/kb/819546 seems to state that mount points ARE supported on these versions. I cannot make out any statement that says that local drives cannot be the targets of the mount points.

Any opinions, good or bad, would be appeciated.

Regards

Perry D.



Post #1206525
Posted Tuesday, November 22, 2011 9:25 AM


SSCertifiable

SSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiable

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 2:38 PM
Points: 6,350, Visits: 13,675
k-335975 (11/10/2011)
I just see the letter of mount point and not underlying disks in the instance list of above counters

you're looking for volumes not disks. They are not actual disks within Windows, they are formatted volumes


CDA (11/10/2011)
So, the one limitation, that I still see with mount points, is still doing any kind of logical detection of free-space.
Say I have a stub drive (drive letter) that's 500mb

xp_fixeddrives will ONLY see the stub drive freespace; it doesn't matter if I have mount points of 2 TB of space underneath it.
some vendor apps fail to install, saying there's not enough free space to complete installation based on this.

the only way I've figured out around this is to drop down into powershell and
gwmi win32_volume|where-object {$_.filesystem -match "ntfs"}|ft name,capacity,freespace

Anyone know of a way (or i'd like sql to have something built-in) to figure this out within TSQL?

you can either use

wmic volume get name, capacity, "free space"

or view through explorer but you'll need to add the extra columns in the explorer window first


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Ya can't make an omelette without breaking just a few eggs"
Post #1210311
Posted Tuesday, November 29, 2011 9:49 AM
SSC Rookie

SSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC Rookie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, December 5, 2012 12:21 AM
Points: 26, Visits: 209
I currently have an issue with Multiple Mount Points and SCOM monitoring our SQL Servers.

This is how our configuration looks like

Possible values for VolumeName along with current mount points are:

\\?\Volume{196adec4-2a1c-11e0-96b6-806e6f6e6963}\
C:\

\\?\Volume{cd7bb9b7-2dd0-11e0-9724-d485645a492c}\
E:\

\\?\Volume{cd7bb9c5-2dd0-11e0-9724-d485645a492c}\
E:\OLAPDATA\DATA1\
E:\SQLDATA\DATA1\

\\?\Volume{cd7bb9cc-2dd0-11e0-9724-d485645a492c}\
E:\OLAPDATA\DATA2\
E:\SQLDATA\DATA2\

\\?\Volume{cd7bb9d3-2dd0-11e0-9724-d485645a492c}\
E:\OLAPDATA\DATA3\
E:\SQLDATA\DATA3\

\\?\Volume{cd7bb9be-2dd0-11e0-9724-d485645a492c}\
E:\OLAPDATA\DATA4\
E:\SQLDATA\DATA4\

\\?\Volume{85ef6b9b-9add-4e88-bbfb-c970696c866f}\
E:\BDATA\

\\?\Volume{196adec5-2a1c-11e0-96b6-806e6f6e6963}\
D:\

Because multiple MP point to the same Volume, SCOM seems to have an issue. Can anyone help here?
Post #1213395
Posted Friday, December 9, 2011 7:45 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, February 16, 2012 1:18 PM
Points: 7, Visits: 21
Great article Perry. I have a question about adding a new instance to a SQL failover cluster. I created a 2-node test environment using Srv 2008 R2, Windows Clustering and SQL 2008 R2 Ent. I followed your article closely and I was able to create the empty application (let's call it WebProd Storage), add the storage and dependencies, create mount points under one drive letter for the application. My question is when I am ready to install a new instance (let's call it WebDev), can I use the existing WebProd drive letter and mount some additional volumes or do I have to have a dedicated empty application for each instance I install, thus another drive letter and mount the new volumes under it?
Post #1219422
Posted Friday, December 9, 2011 8:20 AM


SSCertifiable

SSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiableSSCertifiable

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 2:38 PM
Points: 6,350, Visits: 13,675
kellithompson (12/9/2011)
My question is when I am ready to install a new instance (let's call it WebDev), can I use the existing WebProd drive letter and mount some additional volumes or do I have to have a dedicated empty application for each instance I install, thus another drive letter and mount the new volumes under it?

You can use the same root drive for all of them, however, for management purposes some would choose to create another root drive and letter. It's entirely up to you


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Ya can't make an omelette without breaking just a few eggs"
Post #1219464
Posted Friday, December 9, 2011 10:03 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, February 16, 2012 1:18 PM
Points: 7, Visits: 21
Perry Whittle (12/9/2011)
kellithompson (12/9/2011)
My question is when I am ready to install a new instance (let's call it WebDev), can I use the existing WebProd drive letter and mount some additional volumes or do I have to have a dedicated empty application for each instance I install, thus another drive letter and mount the new volumes under it?

You can use the same root drive for all of them, however, for management purposes some would choose to create another root drive and letter. It's entirely up to you

Then I must be doing something wrong. I created 2 new luns, assigned them to WebProd Storage, created the dependencies for the root drive. When I get to the Cluster Resource Group screen in the SQL installation, the WebProd Storage is not available for me to select as a resource.
Post #1219573
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase ««1234»»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse