Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase 12»»

Market share of SQL server Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Saturday, August 6, 2011 12:35 PM
SSC Rookie

SSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC Rookie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Saturday, January 21, 2012 12:33 AM
Points: 30, Visits: 116
Ok. You spend lots of money and spend years studying to gain some degree of expertise in MS SQL server. However, SQL server's competitions are still alive and well in the job market. Oracle, DB2, Sybase, MySQL and even MS Access. If you get booted your current job where you use SQL server, it can be difficult to find another company that is looking for SQL server skill because that another company could be using Oralce, and in my opinion, it's too much for an average person to gain enough expertise in SQL server and Oracle in one life time.

Anything you can share on this concern?
Post #1155576
Posted Saturday, August 6, 2011 7:24 PM


SSC-Insane

SSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-Insane

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 3:51 AM
Points: 20,807, Visits: 32,742
I have 14+ years experience working with MS SQL Server and for the last year I have been working as an Oracle Database Developer. On the developer side of things it is not too difficult to transfer your development skills between the two. There are differences that may take some time to understand and adapt too, but I found it fairly easy to make the move.

Where there is a greater difference is between being a MS SQL Server DBA and an Oracle DBA. The concepts are the same but the how you do things is much different.

You have to decide if it is worth the move and if so show how your skills can transfer.

Also, if you are trying to find other companies using SQL Server, the best thing you can do is look for your local SQL Server Users Group. That is one of the best places to stat your networking.



Lynn Pettis

For better assistance in answering your questions, click here
For tips to get better help with Performance Problems, click here
For Running Totals and its variations, click here or when working with partitioned tables
For more about Tally Tables, click here
For more about Cross Tabs and Pivots, click here and here
Managing Transaction Logs

SQL Musings from the Desert Fountain Valley SQL (My Mirror Blog)
Post #1155621
Posted Sunday, August 7, 2011 1:01 AM


SSCommitted

SSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommitted

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, November 4, 2014 8:46 PM
Points: 1,786, Visits: 1,015
Frankly I think the trend has recently shifted in favor of MS SQL. Earlier MS didn't have a strong contender in the DB space unlike Oracle. However more companies are using MS SQL server today so your in a better position now than before. Having said this there is no substitute to keeping your skills current and learning a lil bit about other platforms.

E,g if your doubtful about Oracle you could still try your hand at SQL Azure.


Jayanth Kurup
Post #1155637
Posted Monday, August 8, 2011 6:04 AM


Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: 2 days ago @ 9:05 AM
Points: 1,316, Visits: 2,903
Oracle has something like 44% market share and SQL Server has something like 20%. More and more companies are starting to believe that SQL Server can now scale so you will be seeing more and more shops with larger SQL Server based apps. DB2 is loosing market share (we just got rid of all of our DB2 stuff and moved it to SQL Server or Oracle here) and IBM doesn't seem to be focusing much on the mid to small RDBMS market.

Oracle keeps buying up tons and tons of software applications and most of them have a database behind the scenes which will probably ONLY run on an Oracle db so Oracle will hold onto and/or increase their RDBMS market share.



Post #1155955
Posted Monday, August 8, 2011 6:14 AM


SSC-Insane

SSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-InsaneSSC-Insane

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 4:23 AM
Points: 20,584, Visits: 9,624
So let's assume 50 M dev jobs that use sql.

20% of that is 10 M jobs.


Not trying to sound over optimistic here but if you're really looking for job and have half decent interview skills you should be able to find work relatively easily.


In my region I have to turn down direct offers every month and I'm not even advertising. An no, recruiters don't know the direct connection between my profile here and my phone # at home.
Post #1155963
Posted Tuesday, August 9, 2011 11:57 AM


SSC Veteran

SSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC Veteran

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, November 19, 2014 7:18 AM
Points: 251, Visits: 1,758
I've found there to be no shortage of demand for SQL Server work in my location. I politely fend off several recruitment attempts per month, either via LinkedIn or direct contact. My company uses SQL Server, Oracle, and PostgreSQL in its various applications, and we've had the easiest time finding qualified Oracle DBAs and developers of the three.

Post #1157105
Posted Monday, August 15, 2011 2:10 PM
SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, July 25, 2013 3:37 PM
Points: 125, Visits: 438
I agree with previous posters. The market seems to be going mostly Oracle and SQL Server. So many applications come with SQL Server or Oracle as the preferred backend database that it is almost impossible to avoid them. That should lead to plenty of SQL Server jobs in most companies. Tough to avoid Microsoft these days.

I had this decision to make back in 2003. I had the option of becoming a dual DBA in SQL Server and Oracle or I could focus on becoming an expert in SQL Server by doing more projects with Analysis Services. I decided to specialize in SQL Server and I have never looked back.

You can either be average at both or really good at one.
From the DBA perspective, I think the products are simply too huge to be an expert at both Oracle and SQL Server.
From the developer perspective, you can do both.
Post #1160235
Posted Monday, March 12, 2012 3:51 PM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, March 4, 2014 5:07 PM
Points: 1, Visits: 22
well more and more company moving towards SQL server because of cost.
SQL server has more to offer compare to oracle pricing.
5 years ago we moved from sybase to SQL server and recently we moved our some oracle db to sql server.
Post #1265614
Posted Tuesday, March 13, 2012 4:07 PM
SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 3:33 PM
Points: 195, Visits: 1,219
In my part of the world (Phoenix metropolitan area), it is not difficult to find work as a SQL developer. The company I now work for is always looking for people with advanced TSQL skills. It took me one phone call and one day to land my current position and that was over a full year into the economic crunch. There is constant "poaching" going on between companies. Also, I can't overstate the importance of reputation.
Post #1266385
Posted Tuesday, March 13, 2012 7:34 PM
SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, July 25, 2013 3:37 PM
Points: 125, Visits: 438
jshahan (3/13/2012)
There is constant "poaching" going on between companies.


That is true here in the Pacific Northwest also. Every SQL Server person who wants to be employed is likely employed. The only way for the companies to get someone is to poach from another company.
Post #1266450
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase 12»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse