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Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 10:14 AM
Old Hand

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Great question!

Thanks
Post #1155200
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 10:23 AM


SSCoach

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thanks for the ¿



Jason AKA CirqueDeSQLeil
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Post #1155208
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 10:29 AM
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I thought this question was about using approximate data types so got it right for the wrong reason.
Post #1155215
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 10:47 AM
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Excellent question and indeed a brain teaser!

Amol Naik
Post #1155226
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 10:51 AM


Ten Centuries

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Cliff Jones (8/5/2011)
I thought this question was about using approximate data types so got it right for the wrong reason.

I would hope that most viewers of this understand that the FLOAT datatype is generally not a good idea for monetary values, but let's say it to be sure.
Post #1155228
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 11:39 AM


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This has been one of the best weeks for QOTD that I can remember, and today's question was like the frosting on the cake! Thanks to all of you who put the effort into submitting questions to educate and amuse us.
Post #1155267
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 11:53 AM


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john.arnott (8/5/2011)
Cliff Jones (8/5/2011)
I thought this question was about using approximate data types so got it right for the wrong reason.

I would hope that most viewers of this understand that the FLOAT datatype is generally not a good idea for monetary values, but let's say it to be sure.

I would hope that most people realise that in applications where monetary values range from 0.01 units to 90071992547409.92 units (something over nine hundred million million units), and no greater accuracy than two places after the point is needed, float (which is a synonym for float(53)) is usually far more storage efficient and usually far mor eperformance efficient than any decimal or money type, and no less accurate. Let's hope people also realise that that covers the vast majority of applications involving monetary values.

But. let's say it, just to be sure that the anti-float myth invented years ago by Cobol advocates is not carried over unchallenged into modern times.


Tom
Post #1155281
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 2:12 PM
Ten Centuries

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Tom.Thomson (8/5/2011)
john.arnott (8/5/2011)
Cliff Jones (8/5/2011)
I thought this question was about using approximate data types so got it right for the wrong reason.

I would hope that most viewers of this understand that the FLOAT datatype is generally not a good idea for monetary values, but let's say it to be sure.

I would hope that most people realise that in applications where monetary values range from 0.01 units to 90071992547409.92 units (something over nine hundred million million units), and no greater accuracy than two places after the point is needed, float (which is a synonym for float(53)) is usually far more storage efficient and usually far mor eperformance efficient than any decimal or money type, and no less accurate. Let's hope people also realise that that covers the vast majority of applications involving monetary values.

But. let's say it, just to be sure that the anti-float myth invented years ago by Cobol advocates is not carried over unchallenged into modern times.


Nice one TOM... FLOATing is better than SINking...

"Life is tough, it's tougher if your are stupid and use COBOL"
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Post #1155347
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 2:14 PM
Ten Centuries

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Great Question. Saw that your NOT IN had only one result and NOT two right away.
Post #1155348
Posted Friday, August 5, 2011 8:51 PM


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You almost had me



Paul White
SQL Server MVP
SQLblog.com
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Post #1155473
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