Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase ««123»»

Stairway to Data, Step 1: The Basics Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Thursday, May 12, 2011 8:53 AM
Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: 2 days ago @ 7:22 AM
Points: 1,052, Visits: 862
Mark Dalley (5/12/2011)

Now, if every column of numeric data on the various DBMSs carried the units around with it (dollars, years, days etc) so that sanity checks of this kind could be performed automatically when queries were created, I wonder how many calculations would get thrown out as total nonsense?


Now that would be a feature.



Post #1107779
Posted Thursday, May 12, 2011 9:52 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, May 13, 2011 5:43 PM
Points: 1, Visits: 6
I am pretty sure T.S. Eliot never write the lines you attributed to him. Got a reference by chance?
Post #1107846
Posted Thursday, May 12, 2011 1:41 PM


SSCommitted

SSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommitted

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, January 15, 2013 11:11 AM
Points: 1,945, Visits: 2,782
I love those Manga Guides!

there a poster of the basic SI units and the compound units that can be formed from them. Thus we get kilometers per hour for speed, the Newton for force; it is equal to the amount of net force required to accelerate a mass of one kilogram at a rate of one meter per second squared, etc.


Books in Celko Series for Morgan-Kaufmann Publishing
Analytics and OLAP in SQL
Data and Databases: Concepts in Practice
Data, Measurements and Standards in SQL
SQL for Smarties
SQL Programming Style
SQL Puzzles and Answers
Thinking in Sets
Trees and Hierarchies in SQL
Post #1108029
Posted Friday, May 13, 2011 2:51 PM
SSC Rookie

SSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC Rookie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, May 22, 2013 10:26 AM
Points: 30, Visits: 120
Hi, I'm new to SQL (just dove in a couple of months ago with no programming background) and would absolutely love to be able to win the copy of SQL for Smarties mentioned in the article. I've read through a couple of beginner books and now I'm currently reading a borrowed copy of the 2nd edition.

I've done my homework! Do I need to email it somewhere or just post it here? Thanks.
Post #1108728
Posted Friday, May 13, 2011 5:05 PM


SSC Veteran

SSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC Veteran

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, May 16, 2013 3:56 PM
Points: 280, Visits: 140
Aleph_0 (5/13/2011)
(just dove in a couple of months ago with no programming background)


IMO, that is the best place to start from. Too many programmers approach SQL with a "it's not my real job just something I have to poke around in sometimes" attitude, and we get a lot of poor DB design from that. You're starting with the right literature too - Joe's stuff is great!

When I went to college, we were taught EF Codd relations straight up - we didn't even use any software till the second half of the class. If more people started off that way, instead of by hacking together something Visual Studio built for them, then more applications would be built on solid foundations and everybody would save time and money.

The DB is the foundation of your application. Everything else is built on top of that. If more developers approached it that way, it would be a good thing. So keep doing what you're doing - you'll be a valuable asset because of it. Now, if we could just get hiring managers to understand all that crap I just said... :)
Post #1108759
Posted Friday, May 13, 2011 5:48 PM


Say Hey Kid

Say Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey Kid

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 1:43 PM
Points: 687, Visits: 2,995
Aleph_0 (5/13/2011)
Hi, I'm new to SQL (just dove in a couple of months ago with no programming background) and would absolutely love to be able to win the copy of SQL for Smarties mentioned in the article. I've read through a couple of beginner books and now I'm currently reading a borrowed copy of the 2nd edition.

I've done my homework! Do I need to email it somewhere or just post it here? Thanks.


Welcome to SQL Server Central! This is a fantastic community of information.

May I suggest that you focus not only on writing efficient T-SQL, but that you work on understanding what makes good database design, how to normalize tables, etc. If you build a solid schema/table structure that accurately reflects your business, you will easily be able to make later changes to enhance efficiency (indexes come to mind). OTOH, if you build a poor foundation with repeating groups in table columns (for example), it will be much harder to undo that later.

I find that part of this design process is imagination, both positive (what if the company expands into new product lines or geographic areas?) and negative (what if this person is fired? can their accounts be transferred easily without breaking relationships?).

Good luck!
Rich
Post #1108766
Posted Wednesday, June 01, 2011 12:01 AM
SSC Rookie

SSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC Rookie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Sunday, April 06, 2014 7:18 PM
Points: 30, Visits: 113
Great article, but I'm worried about two of the defnitions. In science and engineering, 'precision' is what you called 'granularity'. A more precise instrument is one that allows smaller features to be resolved. Repeatability is just called 'repeatability', and its relationship with precision is not obvious (e.g. a worn micrometer could still give readings to 0.001 mm or 0.0001 inch, but they might be different every time).

Looking forward to the series!

-- Al
Post #1117876
Posted Thursday, July 28, 2011 10:08 AM
Valued Member

Valued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued Member

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: 2 days ago @ 2:08 PM
Points: 62, Visits: 268
Thomas Krystofiak (5/12/2011)
I am pretty sure T.S. Eliot never write the lines you attributed to him. Got a reference by chance?


um, google it. should find about a thousand references.
Post #1150350
Posted Friday, July 29, 2011 3:38 PM


Say Hey Kid

Say Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey KidSay Hey Kid

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 1:43 PM
Points: 687, Visits: 2,995
bagofbirds-767347 (7/28/2011)
Thomas Krystofiak (5/12/2011)
I am pretty sure T.S. Eliot never write the lines you attributed to him. Got a reference by chance?


um, google it. should find about a thousand references.

Done and marked: see my reply to this thread at http://www.sqlservercentral.com/Forums/FindPost1107717.aspx

Rich
Post #1151336
Posted Friday, July 27, 2012 10:22 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, April 07, 2014 4:45 AM
Points: 4, Visits: 84
Nice one, bit vague for the people who cannot understand Mathematics or terms related to mathematics. A great effort by Joe in putting down the basics into work. Nice
Post #1336629
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase ««123»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse