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Getting Up To Speed on SQL Server Denali Expand / Collapse
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Posted Sunday, February 20, 2011 10:14 AM
SSChampion

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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Getting Up To Speed on SQL Server Denali
Post #1066871
Posted Sunday, February 20, 2011 2:47 PM
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I've spent '00:00:00.0000000' hours evaluating Denali. I'm still wrapping my head around SQL 2008 R2. My guess is that it will be well into 2012 before looking at Denali (i.e. SQL 2011 SP1).


James Stover, McDBA
Post #1066892
Posted Sunday, February 20, 2011 4:23 PM


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Haven't looked beyond some of the obvious new features. I intend to take a closer look when the next CTP is released.


Gail Shaw
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Post #1066902
Posted Sunday, February 20, 2011 6:14 PM
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Expressed another way, zero time.

Come on, I haven't got all my SQL 2000 databases up to speed, most of my vendors just started supporting SQL 2005!

Dave


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Post #1066913
Posted Monday, February 21, 2011 2:37 AM
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We only look at new versions of SQL when we think we ought to upgrade, rather than looking at each new release and evaluating it. I realise some of you are thinking "How do you know to upgrade if you don't evaluate?", but it's more a case of if support is ending for the version we use, then we may look to upgrade.

I'd like that to change, but working in the NHS in the UK is problematic for stuff like this. Getting new versions of things is hard unless it's absolutely necessary. And by necessary, I mean if someone is about to die then they might, possibly, sanction a 6-month evaluation plan. As long as it doesn't cost any money. Nor impact on current workload.

Wow - when did I get so bitter!
Post #1066986
Posted Monday, February 21, 2011 6:57 AM
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For those of you who have yet to spend much time with Denali, how do you plan on getting up to speed on it, and when? Will you try to learn more before it is released, or will you wait until it has shipped?


We are still on 2005. Heck, a poll last year at the local user group here in the Dallas area revealed that most companies were still on 2005. The fact that we are in the middle of the worst recession since WW2 means that my company and almost all of our clients aren't going to jump on new, expensive software just to be on the bleeding edge. The fact that except for huge enterprise companies or companies with no existing legacy SQL Servers, there isn't any overwhelming compelling reason to spend the money or time on Denali at this time. By the time I have to deal with it, I'll be buying the Inside Denali R3 books from the used bookstore.

As for new features and such, I guess the blogstars can occupy their time promoting them.
Post #1067084
Posted Monday, February 21, 2011 9:00 AM


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I've been reading up on it, and downloaded the CTP to my home computer. (For most small businesses, my desktop computer at home would be a decent server farm.)

There are definitely some features that are worth looking into.

As for the idea that you don't need to know the features till you're ready for your employer to upgrade to a more recent obsolete version: I guess that works if you can safely assume you will never change employers, your employer will never change policies, your employer's board of directors will never change personnel, laws will never change that affect data security at your employer, your boss will never be replaced, your CIO will never be replaced and will never read a book that gets him excited about something new, and your annual salary review will never include the question "have you kept on top of the database market?".

To me, being able to intelligently anticipate and answer questions about "the next version of the primary tool of my trade" is part of what I'm being paid for. If my CIO ever asks, "Would there be security improvements if we upgrade to the newest version?", I want to be able to answer that, and not have to say, "Well, I haven't bothered to look into that because our company is too cheap to ever upgrade".


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Post #1067152
Posted Monday, February 21, 2011 9:42 AM
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I've spent just enough time evaluating Denali CTP 1 to realize that the cool new features that I want to evaluate aren't available in CTP 1.

I'm now waiting for CTP 2 but not going to hold my breath. If they didn't get a feature into CTP 1 is it really going to be rock solid for release or held together with duct tape and string?
Post #1067168
Posted Monday, February 21, 2011 2:32 PM
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To me, being able to intelligently anticipate and answer questions about "the next version of the primary tool of my trade" is part of what I'm being paid for. If my CIO ever asks, "Would there be security improvements if we upgrade to the newest version?", I want to be able to answer that, and not have to say, "Well, I haven't bothered to look into that because our company is too cheap to ever upgrade".


Valid point if security was the primary concern, but it's not the only reason to upgrade. I keep an eye on the latest released and real versions for features of value and merit. Eventually I will either support them or be programming for them. The industry I work in is very conservative and concerned with ROI, so filling Redmonds coffers every two years by upgrading to every single release isn't a priority. This has paid off by skipping duds such as Windows Vista, waiting for various SP1 and SP2, dodging late bugs, etc... Having been in this business since the DOS days, it pays to let the others take the arrows and glean information from their experiences when the overall cost for licenses/training is high. Not even the developer copies in MSDN tempt me much anymore. Also in a smaller shop/company, the cost of failure is higher and time is dearer.
Post #1067327
Posted Monday, February 21, 2011 3:28 PM


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Most of the companies that I've worked for stay behind the bleeding edge by at least a service pack or two. Some stay close to a full version behind just to be "safe".

I do agree with Gus, though. You should at least know about "the next version of the primary tool of my trade".


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Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

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