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Posted Wednesday, February 2, 2011 6:30 AM
SSCrazy

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A 50/50 shot on groundhog day. Good guess.
Post #1057424
Posted Wednesday, February 2, 2011 6:36 AM


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Koen (da-zero) (2/2/2011)
paul s-306273 (2/2/2011)
So, is the correct answer 'FALSE'?


No, it is TRUE.

You cannot use the /Set or the /Connection option to override single values that are also set by a configuration.

OK, What is the use of /Set or the /Connection option?
Post #1057434
Posted Wednesday, February 2, 2011 6:40 AM


SSChampion

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Carlo Romagnano (2/2/2011)
Koen (da-zero) (2/2/2011)
paul s-306273 (2/2/2011)
So, is the correct answer 'FALSE'?


No, it is TRUE.

You cannot use the /Set or the /Connection option to override single values that are also set by a configuration.

OK, What is the use of /Set or the /Connection option?


Override values that are not set by a configuration
Or you can alter the connection string to the configuration table. If you point the connection string of the config table to another config table, you can change the configurations from within the job.




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What’s the deal with Excel & SSIS?

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Post #1057438
Posted Wednesday, February 2, 2011 7:41 AM


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Thank you Koen (da-zero).
Now, the qotd seems more clear!
Post #1057471
Posted Wednesday, February 2, 2011 8:20 AM


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Hi Carlo,

You are correctly confused, as was I. In most applications the command line wins. I researched this change some and there is at least one legitimate use case for the change. That said, I disagree with this change to the SSIS runtime.

In SSIS 2005, developers had the option of storing values inside the package (design-time defaults), in Package Configurations, or overriding values at runtime.
In SSIS 2008, developers lost the ability to override values at runtime if those same values are stored in a Package Configuration. If developers want to store values in a Package Configuration, the values cannot be overriden at runtime; and if developers want the ability to override the value at runtime, they cannot store the using Package Configurations and must override the value from the command line each time (or accept the design-time default).

I don't like the change.

Further, if this is the chosen default behavior for a use case (or set of use cases), I believe this behavior should be a command-line option or package property - defaulted to the current (new) behavior - but "switchable" to the old behavior from the command line or inside the package at design-time.

Andy


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Post #1057497
Posted Wednesday, February 2, 2011 9:00 AM


Ten Centuries

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Hmm. Had to go look here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc895212.aspx

Beginning of the article ...

1. The /SET option of the DTExec command prompt utility.
2. Property expressions.
3. Package Configurations.

In essence, these three methods let you modify the values of package properties (like connection strings, variable values, network drive paths, etc) each time you run the package, without the need to edit the package in Business Intelligence Development Studio (BIDS).

Further down ...

#Consider using the indirect method whenever possible, as you won’t need to edit the package if the location or name of the configuration file change. With this method, the path and file name are stored in an environment variable.

#If you find that creating environment variables is too intrusive for your scenario, consider using the direct method. But be aware that changes to the file location may trigger changes to the package, or force you to usether options, such asthe /CONF switch on DTExec command line.

#You can override the configuration file path and name from the DTExec utility command line by using the /CONFIGURATION option. This option only affects the package being called from the command line; it does not affect packages executed via an Execute package task from a parent package.

So, is it this last line the question is referring too? Because reading the article as a whole left me thinking that I could make changes.
Post #1057545
Posted Wednesday, February 2, 2011 10:18 AM


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Koen (da-zero) (2/2/2011)
Carlo Romagnano (2/2/2011)
Koen (da-zero) (2/2/2011)
[quote]paul s-306273 (2/2/2011)
So, is the correct answer 'FALSE'?

No, it is TRUE.
You cannot use the /Set or the /Connection option to override single values that are also set by a configuration.

OK, What is the use of /Set or the /Connection option?

Override values that are not set by a configuration

And that's all
The next bit
Or you can alter the connection string to the configuration table. If you point the connection string of the config table to another config table, you can change the configurations from within the job.
is explicitly NOT possible, the relevant words in BoL are
You can use the /ConfigFile option to load additional configurations at run time that you did not specify at design time. However, you cannot use the /ConfigFile option to replace configured values that you also specified at design time.

This amazed me. Especially since those words follow other words that strongly suggest that you can override anything in the config. And even more so because specifying a config did what you would expect in SSIS 2005. MS have reduced flexibility here, and I think it's a silly backwards step.


Tom
Post #1057592
Posted Wednesday, February 2, 2011 10:26 AM
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Thanks a lot,
Now I understand, though the documentation is confusing.
Does anyone has at hand a small sample in order to try it. Even if it sounds well documented I would prefer to have an exercise at hand in order to support the knowledge with practice.

Regards,
Iulian
Post #1057596
Posted Wednesday, February 2, 2011 11:24 AM


SSChampion

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Tom.Thomson (2/2/2011)

The next bit
Or you can alter the connection string to the configuration table. If you point the connection string of the config table to another config table, you can change the configurations from within the job.
is explicitly NOT possible, the relevant words in BoL are
You can use the /ConfigFile option to load additional configurations at run time that you did not specify at design time. However, you cannot use the /ConfigFile option to replace configured values that you also specified at design time.

This amazed me. Especially since those words follow other words that strongly suggest that you can override anything in the config. And even more so because specifying a config did what you would expect in SSIS 2005. MS have reduced flexibility here, and I think it's a silly backwards step.


Wait. Wut?
Did I interprete the following line wrong?

Because the events occur in this order, you can dynamically redirect a configuration by using the /SET command-line option to change the configuration string.




And the award for the most confusing documentation goes to ...




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Post #1057632
Posted Wednesday, February 2, 2011 11:56 AM


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Koen (da-zero) (2/2/2011)

Wait. Wut?
Did I interprete the following line wrong?

Because the events occur in this order, you can dynamically redirect a configuration by using the /SET command-line option to change the configuration string.



I don't know (I'm hopelessly confused too) - but if Andy leonard's answer is correct I think you must have.

And the award for the most confusing documentation goes to ...

One of the worlds politicians, probably, or maybe a lawyer; but if we eliminated all those confusing parasites, that would leave MS as a very strong contender.


Tom
Post #1057645
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