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Posted Thursday, January 6, 2011 1:59 AM


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Craig,

I have not copied these q's from any site, these are the questions i was asked in the interview. I'm a newbie to this site and this is my first post. Before seeing your reply, I never thought that these questions would annoy you so much. Anyway thank you very much all of you for your answers.


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Post #1043543
Posted Thursday, January 6, 2011 2:07 AM


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vinodh247 (1/6/2011)
Craig,

I have not copied these q's from any site, these are the questions i was asked in the interview. I'm a newbie to this site and this is my first post. Before seeing your reply, I never thought that these questions would annoy you so much. Anyway thank you very much all of you for your answers.


There is no problem asking questions at this site. That's what these forums are for.
However, some people are annoyed when it is obvious that the original poster has absolutely done no effort to find some answers on his own. Especially annoyed, when it comes to job interviews, as it is considered unethical to 'lie' yourself through an interview with studied answers. I'm not saying this is your case, but it has happened before. A lot.

Don't let this scare you to use this forums in the future. If you have genuine questions where you cannot find the answer yourself, there are a lot of (expert) people here willing to help. But remember, Google is your friend
Happy discovery of SQL Server!




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Post #1043551
Posted Thursday, January 6, 2011 2:07 AM


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No one's annoyed.

The simple truth is most of those question are easily researchable, and the ability to research is a very important skill for a DBA.



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Post #1043552
Posted Thursday, January 6, 2011 2:11 AM


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vinodh247 (1/6/2011)
Craig,

I have not copied these q's from any site, these are the questions i was asked in the interview. I'm a newbie to this site and this is my first post. Before seeing your reply, I never thought that these questions would annoy you so much. Anyway thank you very much all of you for your answers.


....to add to what Gail said, we don't get annoyed....that easily, but: providing us with your understanding and current level of knowledge, enables us to better answer you. Make sense?


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Post #1043554
Posted Thursday, January 6, 2011 11:24 AM


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vk24/7 (1/6/2011)
Craig,

I have not copied these q's from any site, these are the questions i was asked in the interview. I'm a newbie to this site and this is my first post. Before seeing your reply, I never thought that these questions would annoy you so much. Anyway thank you very much all of you for your answers.


Oh, that's not annoyed. If you want to see me annoyed, go find some of my responses to Celko's postings.

I'm trying to emphasize to you that not doing your own research means that I'm not going to give you my research, and that you need to put some thought into your questions. Why would you post a question requesting assistance for an answer about your own personal experience? It seemed you put no thought, nor effort, into the question list before throwing it up here. I put a little thought, and a little effort, into answering... mostly for other readers.

Your questions I actually would have simply skipped if there weren't others that would end up reading it because of hitcount from Google and the topic title. We're volunteers. If you won't put any effort in, why should I?

This was all mentioned above, but since you specifically mentioned me, I figured it would be worth a response. I'm hoping this will help you in the future when you ask here, or elsewhere, for assistance. Show your work, show your research. Interviews in particular are a sore spot amongst many professionals, as we've pretty much all dealt with the person who's crammed for the test and then forgotten it a week later on the job.



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Post #1043912
Posted Thursday, January 6, 2011 11:26 AM


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GilaMonster (1/6/2011)
Craig Farrell (1/6/2011)
Best way to start that research is get yourself a small partition on a drive (usually your C:\ is smaller), create a database, and fill it with stuff until your Transaction Log is out of room. You'll get some errors. Start researching those errors. It's a common issue.


Good idea, but I'd suggest limiting the size of the log, not filling C drive up. Windows gets a little twitchy when there's no free space on C.


Spoiling all my fun, Gail. The best way to learn how to deal with a truly fragged up computer is to make one. Sadly... I've actually walked onto a site that had a server like that. That was an experience to get going again as a glorified Level I thinking I was actually good at my job.



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Post #1043914
Posted Thursday, January 6, 2011 11:32 AM


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GilaMonster (1/6/2011)
Craig Farrell (1/6/2011)
Best way to start that research is get yourself a small partition on a drive (usually your C:\ is smaller), create a database, and fill it with stuff until your Transaction Log is out of room. You'll get some errors. Start researching those errors. It's a common issue.


Good idea, but I'd suggest limiting the size of the log, not filling C drive up. Windows gets a little twitchy when there's no free space on C.


Which, to me, sounds like a good idea for disaster prep. If you've never had to deal with SQL on a server that's twitchy, you'll be tharn the first time it happens.

Just don't do it on a production server. VM or re-imagable test box is best.


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Post #1043920
Posted Thursday, January 6, 2011 11:44 AM


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GSquared (1/6/2011)
GilaMonster (1/6/2011)
Craig Farrell (1/6/2011)
Best way to start that research is get yourself a small partition on a drive (usually your C:\ is smaller), create a database, and fill it with stuff until your Transaction Log is out of room. You'll get some errors. Start researching those errors. It's a common issue.


Good idea, but I'd suggest limiting the size of the log, not filling C drive up. Windows gets a little twitchy when there's no free space on C.


Which, to me, sounds like a good idea for disaster prep. If you've never had to deal with SQL on a server that's twitchy, you'll be tharn the first time it happens.

Just don't do it on a production server. VM or re-imagable test box is best.


I would certainly opt for the VM if available. Repeated testing is made easier and faster that way.




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Post #1043934
Posted Thursday, January 6, 2011 11:49 AM


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I dug around with a search engine a bit, and "sev3/sev4" refers to software support "severity level". There aren't standard definitions, but it appears that the higher the number, the lower the importance/impact of the incident, with 3 and 4 being, generally, stuff that barely matters or is merely affecting performance, without affecting accuracy or stopping the show. Sev1 would be a down server, a corrupt production database, crashed internet connection, and so on, that cause alarm bells to sound and people to run around and flap their arms and make chicken noises. Sev2 is stuff that affects production but isn't stopping the show. Sev5 appears to generally be things like a background color on the UI making something a little hard to read, or a font someone doesn't like (i.e., should be fixed, but when it's appropriate/convenient).

Which makes the question kind of odd. I'd expect an interviewer to be more interested in prevention/cure of sev1/sev2 than 3/4.

Pretty obvious that, if you have proper DR in place, like automatic failover on to a standby server, a lot of sev1 can be mitigated to 2 or even 3. That would be of interest. But handling of sev3/4? Who cares? Doesn't show anything useful about an interview candidate.

Of course, I'd add to the list sev0. That's where the whole company is shut down and goes out of business because of some system/server/farm disaster. Sev-1, where whole civilizations are destroyed by IT errors (it's gotta happen someday). Sev-2, where humanity itself is threatened by an IT mistake (Terminator, et al). Not sure whether -3 would be destruction of a planet or the whole physical universe being wiped out (LHC doing something they really didn't plan for maybe? Ice Nine?). It's completely extensible!


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Post #1043939
Posted Thursday, January 6, 2011 12:16 PM


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GSquared (1/6/2011)
I dug around with a search engine a bit, and "sev3/sev4" refers to software support "severity level". There aren't standard definitions, but it appears that the higher the number, the lower the importance/impact of the incident, with 3 and 4 being, generally, stuff that barely matters or is merely affecting performance, without affecting accuracy or stopping the show.


LOL. -10: Big Bang inverts. MS Error: An unfathomed error has resulted in the universe, and your solid state drives are now compressed with two trees and a sun. Data is corrupted. Please run DBCC CHECKDB.

You're correct in your searching: Sev1-6 (usually) are usually associated with SLAs (Service Level Agreements). Depending on the location Sev 1/2 are usually catastrophic business failures, with 2 being a vendor based item that the team has little control over.

As you mentioned, 3/4 are usually performance based issues that are affecting the company but are not affecting profit or customer relations. One example I remember offhand was our shipping tracking was down at one location. It was important, but we could still do business online. Think standard 'trouble ticket'.

These are usually encoded in SLA contracts when you've got a provider doing IT support or front end maintenance (IE: Running the online business site for a Fortune 500) and different severities have different requirements for resolution time and penalties for falling outside that resolution window. They'll also have different escalation impacts.

IE: Sev 1: 24/7 support: Call 1 DBA, 1 Developer, 1 System Adminstrator, 1 Business Analyst, immediately. At all times until closed, the conference line must be populated by a member of these groups.

For comparison:
Sev4: Leave the DBA team an email for the morning to put it in their queue.

Hmm, that rambled a bit.



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