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Getting Started in SQL Server Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, December 9, 2010 9:03 AM
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Great Article Craig

This helps a lot seeing from a wide view what really i enjoy regarding databases.

Keep up the good work!
Post #1032511
Posted Thursday, December 9, 2010 9:07 AM
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Craig Farrell (12/8/2010)
Comments posted to this topic are about the item <A HREF="/articles/Career/71608/">Getting Started in SQL Server</A>


Nice article.

As a consultant I go on many interviews and see even more job listings. Most listings include quite a bit that isn't needed for the job or understood by the people looking for someone to fill the position. For example, most seem to think SSIS/SSAS/SSRS is all of a piece. Frequently they only need one of the three, ususally SSRS or SSIS, but they almost always ask for all 3.

Additionally, I've found a good way to advance one's skill set is to constantly go for jobs you're almost qualified for, but are confident you can grow into. It keeps things interesting and lets you learn and grow on the job.


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When you encounter a problem, if the solution isn't readily evident go back to the start and check your assumptions.
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You ask a glass of water. -- Douglas Adams
Post #1032513
Posted Thursday, December 9, 2010 9:09 AM


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Good article Craig.

If you apply where I work you don't need to know anything technical - nobody of that ilk is allowed to interview!
Post #1032518
Posted Thursday, December 9, 2010 10:18 AM


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First, thank you all for your kind words. I came on ~1/2AM my time out of perverse curiousity and must admit, I was worried. It had 600 reads, 3 stars, and no dialogue to tell me why.

I'm glad you're all finding it useful. I wanted to put it together primarily as a starting point for new people, but I'm hoping that it may help interviewers and recruiters along the way figure out what they actually need. They could save money, juniors and low mids could get jobs, and everyone ends up in a better position.

Thank you again. No worries, the second one won't be tooo far off.



- Craig Farrell

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Post #1032573
Posted Thursday, December 9, 2010 10:24 AM


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casinc815 (12/9/2010)

It does appear to be a trend to try to wrap two or three people into one job description only to spin their wheels looking for the elusive superman!


Sad but true, but I actually believe a lot of that is shopping, too. They know what they need and will concentrate a job to that, but if you can pull in someone who hasn't bounced around the industry from contract to contract for the last 10 years (and thus know the market) and just wants a change, and going from $50k/yr to $65k/yr is a huge jump to them, but they're worth 100k+.... 'eh.

Everyone wants to get 'the best they can for their dollar'. The only way to get that sometimes is to write up a job description that shoots for the moon, and during the interview process pick your best fit, with as many extras, for the lowest price.



- Craig Farrell

Never stop learning, even if it hurts. Ego bruises are practically mandatory as you learn unless you've never risked enough to make a mistake.

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Post #1032576
Posted Thursday, December 9, 2010 10:35 AM


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TalkSql (12/9/2010)
Great article Craig,

It was really put well, I now know where to focus more as a developer now and how to steer myself to the next level. I just got laid-off and applying for jobs and whenever the see the job description i get tears in my eyes. They are looking for a superman.

Regards,
Bala


I'm glad I could help. Hopefully you won't be in the hunt for the next logical article after this one (the job hunt), but I wish you luck! This article was primarily written for you and those of your ilk, looking for what to concentrate on to get themselves in the door and having a solid discussion of value trade.



- Craig Farrell

Never stop learning, even if it hurts. Ego bruises are practically mandatory as you learn unless you've never risked enough to make a mistake.

For better assistance in answering your questions | Forum Netiquette
For index/tuning help, follow these directions. |Tally Tables

Twitter: @AnyWayDBA
Post #1032583
Posted Thursday, December 9, 2010 10:38 AM


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Stefan Krzywicki (12/9/2010)

As a consultant I go on many interviews and see even more job listings. Most listings include quite a bit that isn't needed for the job or understood by the people looking for someone to fill the position. For example, most seem to think SSIS/SSAS/SSRS is all of a piece. Frequently they only need one of the three, ususally SSRS or SSIS, but they almost always ask for all 3.


I agree with this. One good example is there's still a LOT of hybrid jobs out there between developer/SSRS that ignore the SSAS engine completely. The reports run directly off the data warehouses. Not that that's a bad thing, but it's really two separate concentrations getting combined... and you're losing over half the fun of the SSRS/AS combination.

I had expected more folks to call me out on not discussing those 'hybrid' jobs, because it's rare a shop ever wants a 'pure' anything, and certainly doesn't advertise it if they think they can also fill in a few other 'holes' while they're at it.



- Craig Farrell

Never stop learning, even if it hurts. Ego bruises are practically mandatory as you learn unless you've never risked enough to make a mistake.

For better assistance in answering your questions | Forum Netiquette
For index/tuning help, follow these directions. |Tally Tables

Twitter: @AnyWayDBA
Post #1032586
Posted Thursday, December 9, 2010 10:45 AM
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Great article!


"can estimate time and personal expectations well, ..."

Should this perhaps be:

"can estimate time and personnel expectations well,..."?
Post #1032594
Posted Thursday, December 9, 2010 11:13 AM


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SQL Server Youngling (12/9/2010)
Great article!


"can estimate time and personal expectations well, ..."

Should this perhaps be:

"can estimate time and personnel expectations well,..."?


Thank you.

No, I had meant it as personal. The personnel part would come into play for the other senior position, the team lead. A high end technical guru is not necessarily the person you want as the lead for others. They know their own business very well, though, and can handle all of the tasks being dropped on *their* plates.

Just to emphasize this: The ability to know which histogram to pull up for getting the proper statistics for a leading edge on an index while simultaneously balancing temp table statistics vs. table variable shortcuts is a deep knowledge skill. They also have a rough idea of how long it will take and what the real priority is to the server and project they're working on.

It doesn't mean they have a *clue* with what to do about a gold-bricking employee in need of inspiration, someone needing significant and patient mentoring, or project management skills such as keeping happy the person who's task is important to those 3 ppl in their department who have to wait on 4 company wide projects first. There is a very significant difference between a Senior in knowledge, and a Senior from a team perspective. Perhaps I needed to emphasize this more. I'll know for next time.

Thank you for that feedback, as well.



- Craig Farrell

Never stop learning, even if it hurts. Ego bruises are practically mandatory as you learn unless you've never risked enough to make a mistake.

For better assistance in answering your questions | Forum Netiquette
For index/tuning help, follow these directions. |Tally Tables

Twitter: @AnyWayDBA
Post #1032611
Posted Thursday, December 9, 2010 11:50 AM
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Craig Farrell (12/9/2010)
SQL Server Youngling (12/9/2010)
Great article!


"can estimate time and personal expectations well, ..."

Should this perhaps be:

"can estimate time and personnel expectations well,..."?


Thank you.

No, I had meant it as personal. The personnel part would come into play for the other senior position, the team lead. A high end technical guru is not necessarily the person you want as the lead for others. They know their own business very well, though, and can handle all of the tasks being dropped on *their* plates.

Just to emphasize this: The ability to know which histogram to pull up for getting the proper statistics for a leading edge on an index while simultaneously balancing temp table statistics vs. table variable shortcuts is a deep knowledge skill. They also have a rough idea of how long it will take and what the real priority is to the server and project they're working on.

It doesn't mean they have a *clue* with what to do about a gold-bricking employee in need of inspiration, someone needing significant and patient mentoring, or project management skills such as keeping happy the person who's task is important to those 3 ppl in their department who have to wait on 4 company wide projects first. There is a very significant difference between a Senior in knowledge, and a Senior from a team perspective. Perhaps I needed to emphasize this more. I'll know for next time.

Thank you for that feedback, as well.


What about someone who's been in the industry a long time and knows a wide variety of technologies to a decent depth if not "guru" level and a good deal about how they interact, does the full lifecycle of the project and has great experience in researching how to do what she or he doesn't know? I'd consider that person senior.


--------------------------------------
When you encounter a problem, if the solution isn't readily evident go back to the start and check your assumptions.
--------------------------------------
It’s unpleasantly like being drunk.
What’s so unpleasant about being drunk?
You ask a glass of water. -- Douglas Adams
Post #1032639
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